To Engage or Not to Engage: Libertarians in Politics

The Anarchist, Non-Voting Government Minister | Phony Drug War Boogeymen

DIRECT LINK TO MP3 (75 minutes)


Guests:
Rodney Hide (00:56), Guillermo Jiménez (37:18).

act-hide

Rodney Hide, campaigning in Auckland, New Zealand (2008).

Rodney Hide of New Zealand was leader of the ACT political party. Upon retirement, when he began a columnist role with the New Zealand Herald, he came out as an anarchist.

I started in Parliament a libertarian. . . . I ended up an anarchist. . . . I have no doubt I was the first Anarcho Government Minister.

He reflects on his experience and whether such an endeavor is worth one’s time. He doesn’t know whether he changed anything, but he does encourage liberty-minded people to get involved, for an enriching experience.

Although many have speculated that he might get back in the ring, since ACT has a leadership vacuum, he dismisses the idea. In particular, he says he does not have the motivation necessary to make it a worthwhile effort, and he plans to support whomever takes the reigns for the struggling party — the only one in New Zealand’s parliament with even a shred of concern for individual liberty.

Guillermo JiménezGuillermo Jiménez (pictured), owner and editor of Traces of Reality and the Demanufacturing Consent podcast, addresses the paranoia that surrounds the drug war and its boogeymen cartel leaders. His PanAm Post column on the topic is here, “The Big Lie: Narco-Terrorist Boogeymen and Our Government Saviors.”

His column came after an interview with Anabel Hernández, a journalist in Mexico and author of Narcoland: The Mexican Drug Lords and Their Godfathers.  She is a hero of mine, given her courage and willingness to attack the lie that the drug war exists to protect the common person.
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María Estrada About María Estrada

María Estrada, the Latin Dreamer, works as an assistant with The Stateless Man, while she studies business administration. Based in Buenos Aires, Argentina, she is originally from Guatemala and has integrated travel into her life. Follow @MariaEstradaS.

2 comments
philiprogerdonovan
philiprogerdonovan

Great work. Really enjoyed this. Regards, from probably the only other anarchist to grow up in Port Waikato (Waiuku).